Pedal Dancer® - A bike travel blog for fans and cyclists. Interest, information and enthusiasm about being a fan, cycling, traveling, and riding a bike. Light on opinion, heavy on information and joy of the sport. Quality of information is very important to me as well as creating a sense of cycling community for visiting fans to any bike race. Pedal Dancer is a sport and travel guide with cycling photography, maps, stories and travel recommendations.

04 July 2011

Word of the Day at the TDF: Le maillot verte

Le maillot verte: green jersey (sprinters jersey)
An explanation of how to accumulate sprinters points in 2011: [corrected content]
The rules for the Sprinters Classification have changed in 2011 for the Tour de France. The changes are simple - there are two choices: sprint in the middle of the race, or sprint for the final stage win at the end of the race.
The same rider might not win both depending on the profile and tactics. They used to have a number of "S" sprint point targets throughout the route of any stage at the Tour de France, now there are only two options for the rider with their eye on the green jersey. Here is what they are racing for:
Intermediate sprint points: 20 points for the 1st rider, 17 for second, 15 for third. Points are awarded down to the 15th rider who is close (prime)

Stage Finish sprint points: The new scale for the points classification at the finish is as follows: ‘Flat’ stages: first place takes 45 points, then 35, 30, 26, 22, 20, 18, 16, 14, 12, 10, 8, 6, 4, and 2. ‘Medium Mountains’ (undulating): first place takes 30 points, then 25, 22, 19, 17, 15, 13, 11, 9, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2 and 1. ‘High Mountains’: first place takes 20, then 17, 15, 13, 11, 10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2 and 1. ‘Time Trials’: first place takes 20, then 17, 15, 13, 11, 10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2 and 1. A mountain stage win is equivalent to an intermediate sprint win. 

Who ever compiles the most points wins the glory of the maillot verte. The stages categorized as flat (En ligne), Medium mountains (Accidentée), High Mountains (Montagne) are listed on LeTour website. Read the point rules for the Green Jersey on the official Tour de France site.

Erik Zabel won six times (from 1996 to 2001), Robbie McEwen has claimed six green jerseys (2002, 2004 and 2006), Baden Cooke took this prize in the Tour’s centenary edition (2003), Thor Hushovd (2005 and 2009), Tom Boonen (2007), Oscar Freire (2008) and Alessandro Petacchi (2010).

 

The Green Jersey (Le maillot verte)

The green Jersey  The green jersey is worn by the leader of the points classification. The points can be won on intermediate sprints and at stage finishes. Prize money: € 25,000 for the outright winner (€ 128,000 in total). The Green Jersey has been sponsored by PMU since 1992.

The Yellow Jersey (Le maillot jaune)

The yellow JerseyThe yellow jersey is worn by the leader of the general individual time classification. Prize money: € 450,000 for the outright winner (€ 1,005,000 in total). The Yellow Jersey has been sponsored by LCL since 1987.

 

The Red Polka Dot Jersey (Le maillot blanc à pois rouges)

The polka dot JerseyThe polka dot jersey is worn by the best climber. Points for best climber classification are awarded at the top of any classified slope. Prize money: € 25,000 for the outright winner (€ 104,700 in total). The Polka Dot Jersey has been sponsored by Carrefour.

The White Jersey (Le maillot blanc)

The white Jersey  The white jersey is worn by the best young rider aged 25 years or less in the general individual time classification. Prize money: € 20,000 for the outright winner (€ 66,500 in total). The White Jersey has been sponsored by Skoda since 2004.

The sprinters have always been my favorite riders in the peloton. The men who embody competition - Maertens, Cipollini, Zabel, Freier, Petacchi, Boonen, Hushovd, and my fav Cav (Mark Cavendish).
Cav politely asking Thor to hand over that jersey, while Thor is counting points on his fingers in argument.